Today In History

2 years 6 months ago - 2 years 6 months ago #661 by Nikita
Replied by Nikita on topic Today In History
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        January 21, 1968


The Thule accident
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 

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2 years 6 months ago - 2 years 6 months ago #662 by Nikita
Replied by Nikita on topic Today In History
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 January 23, 1795


At Den Helder, Netherlands, during the War of the First Coalition, the 8th Hussar Regiment and the 15th Line Infantry Regiment of the French Revolutionary Army, under command of lieutenant-colonel Louis Joseph Lahure, capture a Dutch fleet of 14 warships, 850 guns, the crews and the Dutch fleet commander admiral Hermanus Reintjes, this without causing any casualty on any sides.

Tactic, opportunity and a touch of elegance, this feat of arms is a rare case in history when an entire fleet was captured by a cavalry charge.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
 

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2 years 5 months ago - 2 years 5 months ago #663 by Nikita
Replied by Nikita on topic Today In History
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
January 27, 1967


Astronauts Virgil "Gus" Grissom, Edward White and Roger Chaffee lose their lives in the fire of Apollo 1 command module during a ground test. The Apollo program begins with a disaster.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
 

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"Spaceflight will never tolerate carelessness, incapacity, and neglect. Somewhere, somehow, we screwed up. It could have been in design, build, or test. Whatever it was, we should have caught it.

We were too gung ho about the schedule and we locked out all of the problems we saw each day in our work. Every element of the program was in trouble and so were we. The simulators were not working, Mission Control was behind in virtually every area, and the flight and test procedures changed daily. Nothing we did had any shelf life. Not one of us stood up and said, "Dammit, stop!"

I don't know what Thompson's committee will find as the cause, but I know what I find. We are the cause! We were not ready! We did not do our job. We were rolling the dice, hoping that things would come together by launch day, when in our hearts we knew it would take a miracle. We were pushing the schedule and betting that the Cape would slip before we did.

From this day forward, Flight Control will be known by two words: "Tough and Competent." Tough means we are forever accountable for what we do or what we fail to do. We will never again compromise our responsibilities. Every time we walk into Mission Control we will know what we stand for. Competent means we will never take anything for granted. We will never be found short in our knowledge and in our skills. Mission Control will be perfect.

When you leave this meeting today you will go to your office and the first thing you will do there is to write "Tough and Competent" on your blackboards. It will never be erased. Each day when you enter the room these words will remind you of the price paid by Grissom, White, and Chaffee. These words are the price of admission to the ranks of Mission Control."
Gene Kranz
Flight Director
30 January 1967


"I'm convinced we would have ended up busting our ass in a number of ways before we got to the moon, and we may never have gotten there if it hadn't been for Apollo 1. We uncovered a whole barrel of snakes that would have given us a lot of headaches later on. We would have fixed them bit by bit and probably knocked off a few people in the process of working our way through it. The fire forced us to shut down the program and make a real end-to-end sweep."
Deke Slayton
Senior Manager of the astronaut office
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
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2 years 5 months ago - 2 years 5 months ago #664 by snowman
Replied by snowman on topic Today In History
I wish you could embed memes/ gifs in the reason for editing posts :rofl:

2 February 1943

The last of the German Sixth Army surrendered in Stalingrad, Russia. On the same day, a German reconnaissance aircraft was dispatched to fly over Stalingrad, confirming that all fighting had ceased. After around 5 months of "fighting"

 

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"Straight and narrow is the path."
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2 years 5 months ago #665 by snowman
Replied by snowman on topic Today In History
6 February 1943

All female prisoners at Auschwitz Concentration Camp were gathered for a general roll call at 0330 hours then marched outside the camp. They were kept outdoors until 1700 hours, then were ordered to run back to the camp, prodded by swinging clubs. About 1,000 women died during this forced march. Those who were not able to keep up but survived were rounded up and sent to block 25 in the BIa sector of the camp, from which location they would later be transported to the gas chambers

"Straight and narrow is the path."

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2 years 5 months ago #666 by snowman
Replied by snowman on topic Today In History
8 February 1943

Soviet troops captured Kursk, Russia.

"Straight and narrow is the path."
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